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Buddhist devotional calendars. Special Collections Reading Room. Devote it in meditation to the task of freeing itself from illusion, and we will find that with time, patience, discipline, and the right training, the mind will begin to unknot itself and know its essential bliss and clarity. One of the chief reasons we have so much anguish and difficulty in facing death is that we ignore the truth of impermanence. In our minds, changes always equal loss and suffering. And if they come, we try to anesthetize ourselves as far as possible. We assume, stubbornly and unquestioningly, that permanence provides security and impermanence does not.

But in fact impermanence is like some of the people we meet in life—difficult and disturbing at first, but on deeper acquaintance far friendlier and less unnerving than we could have imagined. Human beings spend all their lives preparing, preparing, preparing….

Only to meet the next life unprepared. What is the nature of mind like?

Raymond Moody: Reincarnation

Imagine a sky, empty, spacious, and pure from the beginning; its essence is like this. Imagine a sun, luminous, clear, unobstructed, and spontaneously present; its nature is like this.

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Imagine that sun shining out impartially on us and all things, penetrating all directions; its energy , which is the manifestation of compassion, is like this: Nothing can obstruct it, and it pervades everywhere. An effortless compassion can arise for all beings who have not realized their true nature.

So limitless is it that if tears could express it, you would cry without end.


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  • Glimpse After Glimpse: Daily Reflections on Living and Dying.

Not only compassion, but tremendous skillful means can be born when you realize the nature of mind. Also you are naturally liberated from all suffering and fear, such as the fear of birth, death and the intermediate state. Then if you were to speak of the joy and bliss that arise from this realization, it is said by the buddhas that if you were to gather all the glory, enjoyment, pleasure and happiness of the world and put it all together, it would not approach one tiny fraction of the bliss that you experience upon realizing the nature of mind.

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How hard it can be to turn our attention within! How easily we allow our old habits and set patterns to dominate us! Even though they bring us suffering, we accept them with almost fatalistic resignation, for we are so used to giving in to them. We may idealize freedom, but when it comes to our habits, we are completely enslaved. Still, reflection can slowly bring us wisdom.

We may, of course, fall back into fixed repetitive patterns again and again, but slowly we can emerge from them and change. In Tibet, people did not distract themselves by spending all their time trying to make their external circumstances more comfortable. They were satisfied if they had enough to eat, clothes on their backs, and a roof over their heads.

Going on, as we do, obsessively trying to improve our conditions, can become an end in itself, and a pointless distraction. Would people in their right mind think of fastidiously redecorating their hotel room every time they checked in to one? Karma is not fatalistic or predetermined. Karma means our ability to create and to change. It is creative because we can determine how and why we act. We can change. This action might not be possible to undo.

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Glimpse after Glimpse Daily Relfections on Living and Dying | Pilgrims Book House

Create a List. Summary New from the bestselling author of The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying thought-provoking meditations on life, death, doubt, mindfulness, compassion, wisdom, work, and more! Read on the Scribd mobile app Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. January January 1 According to the wisdom of Buddha, we can actually use our lives to prepare for death.

January 2 Learning to meditate is the greatest gift you can give yourself in this life. Meditation is the road to enlightenment. January 3 When I teach meditation, I often begin by saying: Bring your mind home. January 4 How many of us are swept away by what I have come to call an active laziness? January 5 Loss and bereavement can remind you sharply of what can happen when in life you do not show your love and appreciation, or ask for forgiveness, and so make you far more sensitive to your loved ones.

January 6 One powerful way to evoke compassion is to think of others as exactly the same as you. January 7 Despite all our chatter about being practical, to be practical in the West means to be ignorantly, and often selfishly, short-sighted. January 8 From the Tibetan Buddhist point of view, we can divide our entire existence into four continuously interlinked realities: 1.

These are known as the four bardos: the natural bardo of this life, the painful bardo of dying, the luminous bardo of dharmata, and the karmic bardo of becoming. January 9 Nothing has any inherent existence of its own when you really look at it, and this absence of independent existence is what we call emptiness. January 11 The Buddhist meditation masters know how flexible and workable the mind is.

January 12 One of the chief reasons we have so much anguish and difficulty in facing death is that we ignore the truth of impermanence. January 13 Human beings spend all their lives preparing, preparing, preparing…. January 15 An effortless compassion can arise for all beings who have not realized their true nature. January 18 Karma is not fatalistic or predetermined. Start your free 30 days. Page 1 of 1. Close Dialog Are you sure?

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